AMP Timeline

Check out our AMP Timeline of key moments that mark Kingston’s cultural history during this period. You can also listen to relevant oral history testimonies of some of our local community members, as they reflect on the colourful musical history – as well as the future – of the area.

1856

The Fighting Cocks pub opens on Old London Road

1875

First art classes held around local schools by artists Thomas and John Fridy, the earliest origins of Kingston School of Art

1899

Kingston’s Schools of Science and Art and Technical Institute is founded (becoming Kingston School of Art in in 1939)

1904

Kingston Museum is built

1920s

Betty Joel’s furniture factory opens on Hook Rise (later site of Gala Cosmetics / Mary Quant makeup)

1930s

Design and Fashion courses are added to the School of Art curriculum

1936

Dorich House is designed and built by Dora Gordine

1940s

The Fighting Cocks hosts a range of American jazz acts on tour.

1940s

Miners makeup moves into the former Betty Joel factory on Hook Rise in Chessington (later Gala Cosmetics).

1956

Arthur Chisnall opens the Eel Pie Island Jazz Club, responding to needs and tastes of the newly emerging ‘teenage class’ from the Kingston Art Schools.

1960

Stanley Picker’s Gala Cosmetics buy out Miners makeup and acquire the Chessington factory.

1965

Kingston Fashion students win the 6th International Youth Fashion Design Contest in St Gall, Switzerland, demonstrating the growing reputation of the Art School under Head Daphne Brooker (a feat repeated in 1966 and 1970).

1966

Mary Quant meets Stanley Picker and together they launch the globally iconic Mary Quant brand of cosmetics from the Gala factory in Chessington.

1968

The Toby Jug Blues Club opens in Tolworth, going on to host performances from Fleetwood Mac, Led Zeppelin, Status Quo, Thin Lizzy and many other legendary names.

1970

Kingston College of Art and Kingston College of Technology reunite to become Kingston Polytechnic.

1972

David Bowie unveils his ‘Ziggy Stardust’ persona for the very first time, at the Toby Jug.

1977

Stanley Picker founds the Stanley Picker Trust to support the education and careers of young arts practitioners.

1987

The first Kingston Green Fair is held in Canbury Gardens.

1990

‘Dodgy Nights’ are launched at Bacchus, launching the career of the band Dodgy who would go on to have chart success with Staying out for the Summer and Good Enough.

1991

Following the death of Dora Gordine, Dorich House is acquired by Kingston University and opens to the public as a museum.

1992

Kingston Polytechnic becomes Kingston University.

1997

The Stanley Picker Gallery opens in partnership with Kingston University, with support from the Stanley Picker Trust.

2000

Jamie O’Grady acquires the Fighting Cocks and Richard Fletcher takes over the Grey Horse; both influential in reviving their respective venues’ reputations for live music.

2002

The Toby Jug in Tolworth – host to David Bowie, Led Zeppelin, Fleetwood Mac and many others – closes and is later demolished.

2004

Banquet Records forms out of the Beggars Banquet chain of shops.

2007

Adam and Liz Lewis take over the Lamb pub in Surbiton, launching the Seething Festival from the pub, with musicians playing at both.

2008

Creative Youth is founded.

2008

The Rose Theatre opens.

2009

The first International Youth Arts Festival launches with live music a core component.

2016

With music now a core part of its offering, the Lamb pub launches Lambstock, Surbiton’s first dedicated music festival.

2018

One of Kingston’s largest venues and nightclubs, the Hippodrome, is permanently closed.

2023

Creative Youth launch FUSEBOX, a multi-arts space for young performers on the Kingston riverside.

2024

Fusebox hosts the AMP Exhibition as part of the AMP Heritage Trail.

AMP Kingston:
Art, Music, Pop Fashion

The AMP Kingston Heritage Trail explores and celebrates Kingston’s rich music heritage from the 1960’s to the present day at key sites across the town.

Find out more and explore the map of venues.